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You are horrible people - Macleans.ca

Scott Gilmore writing for Maclean's:

That is what citizens are complaining about today. They were asked to help save a child and this irritated them. In small towns, when a child goes missing everyone knocks on doors and wakes each other up and searches all night. Because in a community people look out for each other, they understand the duty we owe our neighbours. They recognize that if you want to live in a town that protects its children, occasionally you have to get up, go outside, and help.

 
 
 
 

Facebook's '10 Year Challenge' Is Just a Harmless Meme—Right? | WIRED

Kate O'Neill writing for WIRED:

Imagine that you wanted to train a facial recognition algorithm on age-related characteristics and, more specifically, on age progression (e.g., how people are likely to look as they get older). Ideally, you'd want a broad and rigorous dataset with lots of people's pictures. It would help if you knew they were taken a fixed number of years apart—say, 10 years.

 
 

Is Sunscreen the New Margarine? | Outside Online

So Lindqvist decided to look at overall mortality rates, and the results were shocking. Over the 20 years of the study, sun avoiders were twice as likely to die as sun worshippers.
There are not many daily lifestyle choices that double your risk of dying. In a 2016 study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, Lindqvist’s team put it in perspective: “Avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor of a similar magnitude as smoking, in terms of life expectancy.”

I remember as a kid playing outside constantly in the sun, without a drop of sunscreen on. I always had a tan of some sort, my parents too. Seems like that's how things are supposed to be. Spending all your time indoors means that when you do see the sun, you're more likely to get burned, necessitating the sunscreen.

 
 

Teacher-texting service launches campaign against Rogers, Bell over service charges

On January 28th, 2019, Remind will disable the texting functionality of its service, according to Grey. He added that Rogers and Bell, two of Canada’s biggest telecom service providers, are planning to charge 25x in order for Remind to access their networks.

My kids' school uses Remind. I use the app, but I can see the importance of being able to send these messages via SMS. Rogers and Bell say these increases are to combat spam, but it's pretty clear this is just a cash grab.

 

Ring employees may have been spying on your security cameras and doorbells | iMore

This is obviously a huge invasion of privacy, but it's likely something you agreed to when you purchased a Ring camera and agreed to the company's terms of service and privacy policy.

 
 
 
 

Rogers, Fido increase cost of $60/10GB BYOD promo plans by $5

The plans will cost $65/10GB and the new price will be visible on the first bill on or after February 4th, 2019

Well that's disappointing.

 
 

How to use Files app to replace your lame notes app | Cult of Mac

After trying out the millionth notes/scrapbooking app for the iPad, I realized that I should ditch apps altogether and just use the built-in Files app.

This is an interesting idea. I think I'm going to have to give it some thought.